in General

The Hidden Dragon

Several days ago I finished reading Irene Radford‘s The Hidden Dragon, the first book in her new The Stargods series. It serves as a prequel to her two other Dragon Nimbus series and sheds some interesting new light on the stories told in each of those volumes.

The novel was an interesting look at the development of religion, civilization and communities. While primarily a fantasy / sci fi / adventure novel, it dealt with some controversial subjects quite well. The religion angle was handled especially interestingly, neither condoning it, nor showing it to be entirely useless.

I’ve been reading Irene Radford’s books for quite a few years now, and I’ve always enjoyed them. However, I find myself noticing a great deal of sameness in her stories now. It’s not an entirely negative aspect of her work, but I do prefer when authors are able to diversify to a greater extent.

Overall The Hidden Dragon is a good book and an enjoyable read. It’s certainly more suited for those interested in fantasy fiction already, but I do believe most of you would be able to take something from it and Mrs. Radford’s other novels. The third book of The Dragon Nimbus is one I find to be an especially enjoyable read.

Some comments from others and the cover:

Acclaimed author Irene Radford returns to her beloved Dragon Nibmus universe with book one of The Stargods. Here is the tale of the first Terrans, gifted with both psi powers and technology, who discover a world where dragons are real…and are worshiped as gods.

“A mesmerizing storyteller.” (Romantic Times)

“High fantasy…rousing adventure.” (Library Journal)

Irene Radford has begun a new series that is very different in tone and style than her previous Merlin’s Descendants. The story line is sophisticated yet the interactions between the brothers is both witty and slapstick. There is enough action in THE HIDDEN DRAGON to keep readers turning the pages until they reach the end of the book. It will be very hard to wait for book two in the series so we can revisit those darling O’Hara men.

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