What’s in My Library

~C4Chaos, one of my favourite internet personalities, posed the question, “What’s in your library?” and pointed to an article on the value of libraries to the successful. As a bookworm, I have to respond to that.

Like C4, I have been collecting Ken Wilber‘s books, though I envy his possession of The Collected Works of Ken Wilber. Also in my collection are fiction, graphic novels, meditation, yoga and religion books, art, photography and poetry collections, some magazines such as What is Enlightenment? and Shambhala Sun and an assortment of other treasures.

And then there is my sprawling digital collection that I wish to subsume the rest. I deeply want publishers to embrace digital media so that we can have a small hard drive rather than a room of books as our library. I just want to be able to fill a book chair with books to lend and leave the rest in 0s and 1s. Vast knowledge nested in minimalism is the future!

I should flesh out my Zaadz bookshelf and import what I list at All Consuming.

I’m between books at the moment, so I’d love some suggestions.

4 comments on “What’s in My Library

  1. As much as I agree that digital books should be an alternative to the traditional codex (and one made readily available by the publisher), I cannot agree with a desire to replace tradition with digital form. I, along with a great many people who wear reading glasses, get such a headache from reading off a screen that a digital book would never be a viable option for me. I would get to page one and give up. Plus, even if that were not the case, there is something about a room full of books that enchants me the way a hard-drive never could. I love to stare at covers, flip through bibliographies, and smell that beautiful musty smell of ancient books. I don't know if I could ever choose what book to read if I was presented a library in digital form.

    That's just my two cents worth anyway 🙂

  2. A lot of the newer screens are very easy on the eyes, performing better than paper in many tests. I don't see the display being a big issue as time passes. As for the sensual experience of books, I think that's an experience I'd happily sacrifice for an improved access to books.

  3. As much as I agree that digital books should be an alternative to the traditional codex (and one made readily available by the publisher), I cannot agree with a desire to replace tradition with digital form. I, along with a great many people who wear reading glasses, get such a headache from reading off a screen that a digital book would never be a viable option for me. I would get to page one and give up. Plus, even if that were not the case, there is something about a room full of books that enchants me the way a hard-drive never could. I love to stare at covers, flip through bibliographies, and smell that beautiful musty smell of ancient books. I don't know if I could ever choose what book to read if I was presented a library in digital form.

    That's just my two cents worth anyway 🙂

  4. A lot of the newer screens are very easy on the eyes, performing better than paper in many tests. I don't see the display being a big issue as time passes. As for the sensual experience of books, I think that's an experience I'd happily sacrifice for an improved access to books.

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